The Street’s Secrets: Christopher Becker

© Christopher Becker Photography 2011

© Christopher Becker Photography 2011

Christopher Becker’s images are striking, often haunting representations of nature or cityscapes simultaneously in flux and silence. They are an exploration revealed at once in grand scale and finely detailed minutiae. The unexpected beauty of the object or the captured moment is experienced through Becker’s eyes.

© Christopher Becker Photography 2011

© Christopher Becker Photography 2011

Becker’s light painting work, often captured by a large format film camera, is produced during the darkness of night. Darkroom techniques are incorporated during the camera exposure itself, which can sometimes take up to 6 hours. Becker is often physically but stealthily in front of the camera, on the “canvas” during the exposure, selectively lighting his subject and/or landscape, but does not actually appear in the finished product.

© Christopher Becker Photography 2011

© Christopher Becker Photography 2011

His work can be seen at Holly Hunt in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles. He is represented by Jim Kempner Fine Art in New York City and exhibits in other galleries throughout the U.S, as well as in his own gallery in Kennebunkport, Maine. He also often photographs for the The New York Times, National Geographic Adventure and other editorial publications.  More recently his images have been large installations in cooperate environments.

© Christopher Becker Photography 2011

© Christopher Becker Photography 2011

 To contact Chris and to see more of his work, visit his website here.

2 comments

  1. Flossy

    WOW.. wow. wow.. These photos are beautiful. I mean, I can’t stop staring at them. The feet and the shoes! Awesome. How do you go about creating such images?
    Thank you for sharing your photos.

  2. Hello, thanks for your wonderful comments. I wait until just after sunset to shoot which creates the saturated sky. I try and use vehicles waiting to go through the intersection for lighting. But just available light. I use a slow shutter and a unique point of view. No post exposure manipulation occurs.

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