The Art of Light: Frank Dituri

Elvio's Hat, Italy, 1987 © Frank Dituri

Walking Into, Italy, 1987 © Frank Dituri

Frank Dituri, who divides his time between Italy and New York, is a photographer who likes to transform the obvious into images that border on uncertainty and mystery. His work has been exhibited worldwide throughout the United States, Europe, Russia and Asia with sole shows at the Venice Biennial and the Palazzo delle Esposizioni in Rome. Dituri images have been reviewed and published in many prestigious international publications, including the New York Times, Harpers Magazine, Zoom Magazine, La Repubblica and the Corriere Della Sera. He was a teaching artist for the LTA/Guggenheim Museum Program and is currently in the art department at Libera Accademia di Belle Arti in Florence, Italy. In New York City Frank Dituri is represented by Fran Kaufman Fine Art.

Pillars, Venezuela, 1993 © Frank Dituri

Bliss, Italy, 1995 © Frank Dituri

From Frank Dituri:

Though photography has always been my main focus artists like Giorgio De Chirico, Piero della Francesca and Edward Hopper have had strong impact on my vision; especially their sense of perspective, staging and mystery. Another early influence has been poetry. My mentor, Japanese-American poet Soichi Furuta inspired me to use the word as a point of departure. I look at my photos as visual poems or haiku’s rather then one-liners (decisive moments) or intellectual concepts.

Sometimes making photography is like taking a picture of something I remember seeing somewhere, vague recollections. An example is my early memory of Giorgio De Chirico’s painting, “Mystery and Melancholy of a Street,” 1914, where a young child runs down a deserted square full of light and fragmented shadows playing with a hoop and stick. I have spent many hours in Italian piazzas with my camera in search of this lonely silhouetted figure. The fact that I have never found this fleeting image is not important, because allegorically it as become an intrinsic part of my psyche/work.

Light in the Forest, New York, 2003 © Frank Dituri

At the Cloisters, New York, 2001 © Frank Dituri

In the last 10 years I have been interested in the special light that exists in the dark horizon and other dimly lit places. The subtle light that is not only seen with the eyes but felt with the whole body. For example, as a young boy I spent many hours in a basement watching television in the dark. The fuzzy black and white pictures on the TV screen would paint the room with a dark neon light. I would sit there for hours, alone, surrounded by shadows and figures that would dance then disappear in my head. This type of submerged childhood experience has resurfaced, in part, in many of my images.

For me photography is more than a visual documentation; it is a personal journey, where dreams transcend reality, and facts and the ethereal are often merged. My subjects which are neither coming nor going, but somewhere in the process are like lost souls in a recurring dream where silence is never broken and light and darkness co-exist; a poetic metaphor where deep in the shadows and the incomprehensible there is fear and uncertainty.

Monica in Kingston, New York, 2001 © Frank Dituri

Man, in the Forest, Italy, 2002 © Frank Dituri

To contact Frank and to see more of his work, visit his website here.

One comment

  1. Many of the emerging new artist nowadays are using this technique when they want to emphasize something on the image. Some of them even added detail through the use of innovative application to make it more attractive. A cool and great way to give an image a value.

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